Archives

The Cranial Nerves and the Swallow

Published by <p>This handout defines the 5 most important cranial nerves as related to swallowing and outlines specific problems that may occur due to damage along the pathway of these nerves. <div class="woocommerce"> <div class="woocommerce-info wc-memberships-restriction-message wc-memberships-message wc-memberships-content-restricted-message"> This content is only available to members. </div> </div> </p>

The Brain and Swallowing

Published by <p>Swallowing is a complex automatic process we often take for granted until this daily activity becomes difficult. This material provides some insight into how the brain stem and brain work simultaneously to make swallowing happen safely. <div class="woocommerce"> <div class="woocommerce-info wc-memberships-restriction-message wc-memberships-message wc-memberships-content-restricted-message"> This content is only available to members. </div> </div> </p>

Swallow Initiation

Published by <p>Just how exactly is the swallow triggered? This handout describes the oral and pharyngeal sequences involved in a successful swallow. Also discusses swallow delay as well as how speech therapy can improve swallow initiation and reduce the risk of dysphagia and associated aspiration. <div class="woocommerce"> <div class="woocommerce-info wc-memberships-restriction-message wc-memberships-message wc-memberships-content-restricted-message"> This content is only available to members. </div> </div> </p>

SLP Role in the Esophageal Stage of Swallowing

Published by <p>What exactly is our role when it comes to esophageal dysfunction? This material describes the SLP’s role in screening for/being a part of a multidisciplinary team to treat esophageal dysphagia. Includes a handy reference chart for comparing and contrasting the symptoms of each etiology of dysphagia. <div class="woocommerce"> <div class="woocommerce-info wc-memberships-restriction-message wc-memberships-message wc-memberships-content-restricted-message"> This content is only available to members. </div> </div> </p>

Pharyngeal Stage of Swallowing in Adults

Published by <p>This material describes the pharyngeal components of normal swallowing in adults. Broken down piece by piece and taking up 2 pages, every detail of the anatomy and physiology of this enormously important and very fast phase of the swallow is explained. <div class="woocommerce"> <div class="woocommerce-info wc-memberships-restriction-message wc-memberships-message wc-memberships-content-restricted-message"> This content is only available to members. </div> </div> </p>

Oral Preparatory and Oral Stages of Swallowing in Adults

Published by <p>This resource describes the oral components of normal swallowing in adults. <div class="woocommerce"> <div class="woocommerce-info wc-memberships-restriction-message wc-memberships-message wc-memberships-content-restricted-message"> This content is only available to members. </div> </div> </p>

NG Tube Effect on Swallowing Physiology

Published by <p>A common question asked by SLPs is whether the presence of an NG tube affects swallow function. This clinical resource provides insight and answers to this question using research on both normal and post-stroke populations. <div class="woocommerce"> <div class="woocommerce-info wc-memberships-restriction-message wc-memberships-message wc-memberships-content-restricted-message"> This content is only available to members. </div> </div> </p>

Let’s Talk Aspiration: How Much is Too Much?

Published by <p>This material explains the difference between “aspiration” and “silent aspiration.” New research with healthy swallows shows occasional aspiration and silent aspiration can be tolerated by the body in small amounts. This information will help with the differential diagnosis of dysphagia and presbyphagia and prevent over-diagnosis of dysphagia. <div class="woocommerce"> <div class="woocommerce-info wc-memberships-restriction-message wc-memberships-message wc-memberships-content-restricted-message"> This content is only available to members. </div> </div> </p>