10 Quotes About Aphasia by a Person With Aphasia

Aphasia, My World Alone by Helen H. WulfHelen H. Wulf, stroke survivor and person with aphasia, provides an extremely rare and personal glimpse into what it's like to live with aphasia, or the loss of access to the language network of the brain after a brain injury. Helen was born in Chicago and attended Northwestern University, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and received a B.A. dgree in 1935. She holds an M.A. degree in Sociology (1958) from Southern Methodist University. She wrote this book after dedicating years to her stroke recovery. She believes that there are many things that "need badly to be told in the interests of aphasics-to-be" and that "future aphasics will be helped if works like this are allowed to come to fruition."

The following are 10 quotes from her book, published in 1986 by Wayne State University Press and part of the William Beaumont Hospital Series in Speech and Language Pathology.

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Aphasia, My World Alone - Insights into Aphasia - Therapy Insights

Other books about aphasia:

Therapy Insights materials and resources to address aphasia:

  • Bundle of Aphasia materials
    86 pages and 114 MB of aphasia-related materials developed by Therapy Insights. Sold as a bundle with a 10% discount.
  • Emergency Aphasia Card
    A card featuring communication strategies for people with aphasia. Designed for people with aphasia to carry with them in their wallets/purses when out in the community, including a place for emergency contact information.
  • Handout: Primary Progressive Aphasia
    This handout is designed for speech-language pathologists working with patients who are experiencing primary progressive aphasia. The handout describes what it is, lists the signs and symptoms, and discusses treatment options with a focus on preservation of current skills rather than a cure or resolution to a currently poorly understood condition.
  • Handout: Aphasia and the Brain
    Handout for patients and their families that describes Broca's area, Wernicke's area, and the arcuate fasciculus as they relate to language function and aphasia. This handout is meant to capture the basics of brain areas that aid in motor speech vs. comprehension as well as the part of the brain believed to link the two areas.
  • Mindfulness Exercise for SLPs: Aphasia Awareness
    This exercise is intended to do two things: 1) Provide awareness about the existence of aphasia and how people can be most helpful when meeting someone with aphasia and 2) provide clinicians with a mindful perspective about what it means to be unable to communicate for a short period of time.
  • Handout: Types of Aphasia and their Neurological Correlates
    This handout is designed for speech-language pathologists looking for a visual way to describe the varying ways that aphasia may present given a particular brain lesion. The handout describes the common signs and symptoms of the types of aphasia.
  • Low-Vision, Aphasia-Friendly Visual Pain Scale
    This resource is designed for rehabilitation therapists working with people who are experiencing low vision and/or aphasia. The highly legible, colorful, and graphics-based pain scale allows nursing and other care-giving staff to communicate with their patients about their level of pain throughout the day for the purposes of pain management.
  • Make-Your-Own-Communication-Board for People with Aphasia
    A quick tool for Speech-Language Pathologists to build custom communication boards for people with aphasia or other communication barriers. This digital download comes with 5 pages of icons (60 icons total). The patient can select words that they find useful. Cut, paste, laminate.
  • Handout: What is Apraxia? What is Aphasia? - in English or French
    Handout for families of patients in speech therapy focused on apraxia of speech and aphasia.
  • 5 Pocket-Sized Low Tech AAC Cards for People with Aphasia
    5 low-tech AAC cards designed for people who want a low-key, basic, pocketable communication tool. The five cards feature an alphabet board, basic words (nurse, doctor, bathroom, medications, glasses, shoes), emojis to communicate emotions, a visual pain scale, and yes/no card with communication strategies.
  • Language Intervention: Interview Questions to Improve Quality of Care for Those With Aphasia
    Designed for speech-language pathologists working with people who have aphasia. This interview form is to be filled out by friends/family who know the patient in order to improve quality and relevance of speech therapy.
  • Language Therapy Task: Feature Analysis Word Maps
    Language therapy task with 10 pages of stunning photos with word maps tackling semantic feature analysis.
  • Two Language Tasks for Constraint-Induced Language Therapy (CILT)
    Constraint Induced Language Therapy relies on solely verbal communication, avoiding the use of compensatory strategies such as gesturing, drawing, writing, etc. The two tasks included in this product force patients to use only verbal language to either
 A) put pictures of objects in a particular order, or B) place objects in the correct location within a blank scene.
  • Handout: Melodic Intonation Therapy
    This handout is designed for speech-language pathologists using melodic intonation therapy to address expressive language impairments in the context of brain injury. The handout describes how melodic intonation therapy works with a simplified visual of brain anatomy. Patients, staff, family, and caregivers will gain a deeper understanding of this therapy intervention by reading this handout.
  • Automatic Speech Cards
    This intervention visual is designed for speech-language pathologists working with adults to address expressive language impairments related to brain injury. The digital download features 4 pages of automatic speech visual cues, including popular song lyrics, the numbers 1-10, days of the week, and months of the year.
  • Alphabet Board
    Alphabet boards to have handy when assessing people with aphasia or other communication barriers. Two separate layouts: alphabetical and QWERTY keyboard.
  • Communication Precautions Communication Form
    This form is designed for speech-language pathologists in medical settings needing to articulate communication precautions to nursing, physician, therapy, and kitchen staff.
  • Language Task: Building a Medical History Form
    This therapy task is designed for Speech-Language Pathologists working with people who have aphasia or other communication impairments. It is based on the PACT method, published in The ASHA Leader, March 2016. Instructions: In a structured therapy session, complete these forms with a patient who has communication challenges before they go to doctor’s appointments. Ensure that a copy is sent with all medical appointments that the patient has scheduled.
  • Constraint-Induced Language Therapy (CILT) Task: Building a Garden
    Constraint Induced Language Therapy relies on solely verbal communication, avoiding the use of compensatory strategies such as gesturing, drawing, writing, etc. The two tasks included in this product force patients to use only verbal language to accurately place plants in a garden.
  • Constraint-Induced Language Therapy (CILT) Task: Organizing a Workspace
    This task is designed for speech-language pathologists working with people on functional vocabulary and conversation using the constraint-induced language therapy model. Patients are challenged to place objects in a workspace according to how they are described.
  • Language Task: Automatic speech scenes
    This product is designed for speech-language pathologists working with patients who are strengthening their automatic expressive language. These 12 scenes can be used to illicit spontaneous speech of common phrases, such as, "Thank you," "hello," "goodnight," etc.
  • 5 Alternating Attention Tasks (no language required)
    These 5 alternating attention tasks require patients to alternate attention between the objects ordered at the top of the page and the objects randomly placed below. These tasks do not require the patient to read and may work for people who have aphasia or when there is a language barrier.
  • Language Task: Inclusion/Exclusion of Categories
    This task is designed for speech-language pathologists targeting language categories in structured therapy settings. The patient is asked to circle items that belong to a category and put an X through items that do not belong. This product contains three categories: Fruits, animals, and things that start with B.
  • Language task: Matching pictures to words
    This language task features 48 word squares that correlate to 48 single written word cards. The task is designed for Speech-Language Pathologists working with people who have therapy goals related to word-finding, single word functional reading, and visual-spatial matching.
  • Word-Finding Strategies
    This handout visualizes 9 strategies patients can use when they get stuck and can't find the word they want. Pair this handout with therapy tasks targeting word-finding.
  • Handout: 10 Major Symptoms of Left vs. Right Brain Damage
    This handout provides simplified breakdown of the basic differences between left and right brain damage with a specific focus on aphasia, alexia, dyscalculia, apraxia, agnosia, left neglect, insight, inhibition, music, and symbols.